Auto Window Tinting Terms You Should Know

As Orlando window tinters, we here at Flying Window Tinting Orlando, know that it’s easy for our customers to get confused by the jargon that we throw around as window tinting professionals. So today, we want to give you a quick rundown of auto window tinting terms and their definitions so that when you decide to get your car windows tinted locally, you know exactly what’s happening.

 Auto Window Tinting Terms You Should Know

When your auto window tinting professional starts talking about tinting your car windows you may hear some of these terms thrown around, here’s what they mean.

Dual-Reflective Film

Dual-reflective film is a film that most people think of as “one-way mirror film”. This is an interior film that is neutral on the inside and reflective on the outside. It’s important to know that each state has laws governing how reflective a window film can be.

Dyed Film

Also known as non-reflective film, this is a film that is colored with dye that is either added to the surface of the film or the film adhesive.

Emissivity

Emissivity refers to the amount of infrared light or radiation is absorbed by the surface of a auto  window tinting film. Lower emissivity numbers mean that less light is absorbed by the film.

Exterior Visible Light Transmission

Exterior visible light transmission is also referred to as VLT and it refers to how much light is able to pass through tinted glass from outside the vehicle. Different states have different legal levels of exterior visible light transmission and if you fail to adhere to those levels, you risk a fine and having to have the film removed from your car windows.

Glare Reduction

Glare reduction refers to how much light is rejected by an auto window tinting film. Quite simply, this is the opposite of visible light transmission.

Hybrid Film

Hybrid films are auto window tinting films that combine the process of dyed films and metalized films to achieve a dual-function film.

Infrared Light

This is a term that you will hear often and frequently we have customers come to us who are embarrassed that they don’t know what infrared light is. Don’t be embarrassed because you’re not alone. Infrared light is electromagnetic radiation that is invisible to the naked eye. When we talk about infrared light, we’re talking about light that has a specific wavelength that is longer than visible light (specifically, a wavelength of between 0.0007 millimeters and 1 millimeter). 

Interior VLT

Interior VLT is also referred to as interior visible light transmission and is used to describe how much visible light can pass through tinted windows from the inside of your vehicle. Most often when we refer to interior VLT, we are talking about a dual-reflective film.

Metalized Film

A metalized window film is a film that has a thin metal layer over the surface of the film. This is beneficial because it decreases the amount of heat that is absorbed by your vehicle and it also helps to protect your car’s interior from fading or sun damage.

Natural Film

Sometimes you may hear your Orlando window tinters refer to what we call a “natural film”. A natural or neutral film is a tint film that does not have a reflective property to it meaning that you can see into and out of the windows once they are tinted.

Reflectance

Reflectance is usually used when referring to

Auto Window Tinting

, and it refers to how much heat or light a auto window tinting film reflects rather than absorbs.

Safety Film

Safety film is a term that is used frequently by manufacturers when they’re marketing their auto  window films. This refers to a window tinting film that is thicker than average (4Mil thick rather than 1.5Mil thick) and increases the glass protection offered by the auto window tinting film.

Shading Coefficient

The shading coefficient is used to rate the solar properties of a window tinting film. You can obtain a shading coefficient by dividing the amount of solar heat increase that passes through the window film by the same amount that passes through a normal, untinted window. The lower the shading coefficient, the better a window film is at rejecting solar heat.

Solar Heat Gain Coefficient

The solar heat gain coefficient is another measurement of solar heat only this time it is a ratio that is derived by dividing the amount of solar heat gain that is transmitted or absorbed through a window film by the amount of normal solar incidence of radiation. Unlike the shading coefficient, the solar heat gain coefficient is measured on a wavelength by wavelength basis. Again, the lower the solar heat gain coefficient of a auto window tinting film, the better the solar properties of that film are.

Total Solar Absorbance

This refers to the amount of heat and light that is absorbed by a window film that you have installed by your Orlando window tinters.

Total Solar Energy Rejected

This refers to the amount of heat and light that is rejected by a window film that you have installed by your Orlando window tinters.

Total Solar Reflectance

This refers to the amount of heat and light that is reflected by a window film that you have installed by your Orlando window tinters.

Total Solar Transmittance

This refers to the amount of heat and light that is transmitted by a window film that you have installed by your Orlando window tinters.

Looking For Orlando Window Tinters?

Are you on the lookout for experienced Orlando window tinters to make sure that your auto window tinting is done professionally? Flying Window Tinting Orlando can help! Just give us a call at (407) 380-1202 to make your appointment today and we guarantee that you’ll be happy with your car’s window tinting!

This was written by Steven Hopkinson owner /operator of Flying Window Tinting.

`We have been in business in Orlando same location

for over 20 years

We serve the following locations
orlando
winter park
alafaya
azalea park

We also provide the following service

Window tinting
tint removal
headlight cleaning
vinyl graphics

Contact us for free quotes on your vehicle 407-380-1202