Computer Cut Window Tint is a must for Quality Installation

Computer cut window tint has been out for about 15 years. Not all window tint shops carry computer window tint because unless you have a high-volume shop it’s not worth the expense of investing in the equipment and software. A lot of window tinters hesitant on embracing computer cut because they thought expense was too much and that they do better quality and cutting the tint. They are many reasons i write  below why going to Window Tint Shop to have your car tinted and having the computer  pre-cut your window tint  and not have them hand cut the tint

100% Accuracy

We love our employees, but when it comes to cutting tint no human being can deliver the level of precision possible with computer-driven machines. When you bring your vehicle to Flying Window Tinting our technicians use an extensive vehicle database to locate the exact size and specifications of your vehicle’s windows. The computer can then dial in those specs, and transfer them to a cutting machine, also known as a plotter, which cuts whole clean pieces of tint according to the exact size of your windows.

No Knives, No Risk

Our plotter does all the cutting, so all our technicians have to do is peel away excess tint and apply it to your vehicle. Since our tint pieces are all pre-cut, there never a time that a knife used near your vehicle. There no risk of damaging glass or rubber seals. Be wary of other tint shops that lay tint on your windows and cut it directly on your vehicle. We found over the past 10 years. The glass got a lot softer on the chance of scratching. Glass has gotten higher if you cut on the car.

The glass that cars come with now is a lot softer because they are trying to reduce the weight of the glass so it’s not as dense as in older cards. Another risk of using a knife to cut your tint on your car is that. When they cut on the edge of the glass where there are a rubber trim chances of them cutting the rubber increases quite a bit. And I saw some cars where you cut the rubber too low it could cause leaking in the car. Not to mention the cost of replacing the rubbers which many companies that are not reputable might not want to cover the cost process to give a quality job I know damage to the customer’s car.

Expert Installation

Once the machines have done their thing, it’s time for our certified window tint installers to take the pieces and skillfully apply them to your windows. With years of experience, our installers can deliver a near flawless fit, and since we cut whole tint pieces. There is no need for additional cutting and the margin for error even further diminished.  I have been tinting for over 25 years And by far the computer cut process is its biggest game-changer in the window tint business. this gives it our installers a better product to work with since all the windows are cut the exact same way. When you cut by hand you may have a different edge or corner on one window opposed to another window on the opposite side of the car.

Which Method Looks Better?

Can a veteran window tinter do just as good a job of cutting film as a computer-controlled plotter? Nine times out of 10, the answer is yes. However, what about those days when there are distractions? What if the knife gets dull? A fact of life is that accidents happen. Cutting your window film on a plotter means that we do not go near your vehicle until it is time to clean the windows and begin the installation. The plotter cuts the same path every time. The lines are perfectly straight, with no jagged or wavy edges.

Your Vehicle is Not a Cutting Board

Installing window film on your car or truck requires cutting each piece of tint to size and applying it to your window. Historically, tinters would lay a large piece of film over your window and, using a bright light, cut along the visible edge of the window with a sharp knife. Once the tint is cut, it can installed on the inside of the glass.

The problem with cutting window tint on your vehicle is that the knife can mark or scratch your glass. These cut and scratch marks can cause stress points in your glass that could lead to failure in sudden temperature swings or if a hard object hits the glass. Removing the scratches and cut marks nearly impossible.

Hand-cutting window tint also runs the risk of damaging the rubber seals around your windows and plastic trim. Your paint can be scratched because someone is leaning over your car or truck for extended periods of time. We are not saying that tinters that cut by hand cannot do a good job– they simply expose themselves and your vehicle to more risk.

Computer plotters cut film pieces with exact precision

The information they use accessed through a large database containing film patterns that match the glass and body dimensions of your car model. The patterns developed utilizing the best practices for the automotive tint industry. All the templates that come in the software carefully designed by the car manufacturer to give the exact size and measurement to each window.  Nowadays with everything made from computers. There is no variation in sizes. So you will always get the perfect fit with a cut from the computer.

A computer cutting plotter is consistent

It cuts a pattern the same way every time. This eliminates the problem of human error, which is extremely common in the process of making patterns by hand. They reduce film waste due to miscuts. They also save time from getting your vehicle tinted and delivered back to you more quickly. If you concerned about the environment, it’s important to note that reducing wasted film material and energy also reduces the carbon footprint of the company using the system, your car is safe from cutting mishaps.

No cutting occurs on any part of the vehicle. Cutting automotive glass patterns by hand without etching or scratching the glass requires an extremely delicate touch and years of experience. Damage to glass, paint and rubber gaskets by sharp blades are common when using the older technique. With a plotter on the team, your immaculate and beloved car won’t going under the knife.